The Path

This is one of my favorite places on the path around White Rock Lake. The path goes through some trees and then turns right to an open area that overlooks the entire lake. It is close to the Bath House.

Here, for those who insist on the truth, is the original photo. But do you really want the truth? The picture below is NOT what I truly experience when I am on this section of the path. Because of the magnificent way God designed us, we take in a scene with stereoscopic vision (try closing an eye and looking into branches to appreciate what this means). We hear and smell, look around, and the brain combines everything into an image that greatly surpasses what can be captured in a still image… no matter how good the camera! So, I must edit photos to convey what I EXPERIENCED, not merely what the camera captured in a thoughtless moment of time.

You’re Never Too Old for Counseling

By the way, the words I quoted were from a young lady with tremendous promise. This is not the first time of late that a younger person has pointed me in the right direction. My joking response was that old Scottish men solve their problems with Scottish drinks, but I DID hear what she was saying. I love being part of the family of God, where His Spirit makes significant use of old and young, male and female, rich and poor. Bless you, younger sister.

Horse Nettle Fruit (NOT Edible!)

Horse Nettle fruit (NOT edible!)

Last year, I wrote this Strange, Belated “Happy Birthday” to My Sister, Cindy DeBoer:

Walking at the lake today, I encountered a young family. The mom was picking what looked like wild green tomatoes from the weeds by the path. I stopped to admire the pile of fruit. The husband came over. Short and shirtless, he had the sort of build that told me “this man fears few things.” I asked, “Do you eat these?” Smiling, he answered, “Yes, we eat these in our country.” “What is your country?” “Nepal.” “Oh, so you lived at high elevation?” “Yes, we have the tallest mountain in the world.” “You cook these before eating them, right?” (I recognized them as some form of nightshade). “Yes.” “Well, God bless you.” I resumed my walk and sighed, “God, let me meet them again in Heaven.” Later, it occurred to me that if I do meet them in Heaven, they’ll probably say, “You’re Cindy DeBoer’s little brother, aren’t you!” By then, she’ll be known Heaven-wide as the one who loved strangers well, and did more than ask rudimentary questions. She’s my big sister, and I still have a lot to learn from her.

Bumblebee and Passion Flower

Bumblebee gathering nectar from Passion Flower gets his back dusted with pollen from down-facing anthers. I wonder how the pollen then gets transferred to the towering stigma?

Bumblebee gathering nectar from Passion Flower gets his back dusted with pollen from down-facing anthers. I wonder how the pollen then gets transferred to the towering stigma?

I found the “anther” on another site: the stigma-bearing styles bend down at some point and receive pollen that was previously deposited on bee’s backs by the anthers. Here’s an excellent website on the subject: http://www.microscopy-uk.org.uk/mag/indexmag.html

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Photo taken at: White Rock Lake Bike & Hiking Trail

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Ever seen a Question Mark? Now you have. That’s the name of this butterfly.

Ever seen a Question Mark? Now you have. That’s the name of this butterfly.

Ever seen a Question Mark? Now you have. That’s the name of this butterfly. This one showed up in my moss garden just after I had watched a cardinal, cedar waxwing, and black capped chickadee perching on the rim of the birdbath facing each other and taking turns splashing in the water. After they left, the great architect Christopher Wren dropped by for a visit. I’m so thankful for this view of God’s creativity from my office window.

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Photo taken at: East Dallas, Dallas

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The Amazing Passion Flower

The passion flower never ceases to amaze me. From an A&M horticulture website: “Roman Catholic priests of the late 1500’s named it for the Passion (suffering and death) ofJesus Christ. They believed that several parts of the plant, including the petals, rays, and sepals, symbolized features of the Passion.”

The passion flower never ceases to amaze me. From a Texas A&M horticulture website: “Roman Catholic priests of the late 1500’s named it for the Passion (suffering and death) of Jesus Christ. They believed that several parts of the plant, including the petals, rays, and sepals, symbolized features of the Passion.”

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Photo taken at: White Rock Lake Bike & Hiking Trail

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Penngift Crownvetch

Penngift Crownvetch

See this interesting writeup about the flower (excerpt: “First discovered in 1935 on Mr. Gift’s farm in Pennsylvania, Penngift Crownvetch (Coronilla Varia L. Penngift) is valuable as food for livestock, erosion control , and nitrogen feeding of the soil. The Pennsylvania Department of Transportation has planted it along roads throughout the state. Penngift Crownvetch produces attractive rose, white, or pinkish-white flowers from June to September.”)

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Photo taken at: White Rock Lake Bike & Hiking Trail

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